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East Surrey

Information from Meds Management:

Dear Nick Cahm,

Thank you for your  enquiry on ESCCG’s Freestyle Libre policy.

The CCG's  current decision remains the same until the 1st April 2019 (see ESCCG updated position statement from November 2018: https://surreyccg.res-systems.net/pad/Search/DrugConditionProfile/5674).

East Surrey CCG are in the process of implementing the national arrangements as described by NHS England, in readiness for the 1st April 2019. An update to the position statement and prescribing information will be made available on the Surrey PAD from this date.

I hope this helps with your query.

Here is the information from the Surrey PAD (plenty of additional information on the website linked above):

INTERIM HOLDING STATEMENT:

The APC has recommended prescribing of flash glucose monitoring system (FGS) in line with guidance from NHS England

It was given a BLUE traffic light status.

Commencement must be within a diabetes specialist led clinic.  At least 1 month supply of sensors must be provided  (current exception is a local agreement with Frimley Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust which is a minimum of 2 weeks supply) by diabetes specialist teams before the patients primary care prescriber is asked to accept clinical responsibility for prescribing flash glucose sensors for individual patients.

Patients should not be referred specifically for the initiation of FGS. Eligibility is expected to be assessed during routine consultations with specialist as part of the patient's annual diabetes review or a review that takes place as a result of other changes in their diabetic needs

The APC policy statement is being written but this interim statement will provide some clarity for patients and prescribers whilst the details are being finalised


New patients

Will be treated as per the NHS England guidance issued on 7th March 2019. The Diabetes specialist service will consider treatment initiation at the patient’s next scheduled diabetes appointment. Patients should not be referred into NHS services just for consideration of FGS.

Patients initiated on FreeStyle Libre under RMOC guidance by NHS specialist diabetes service

Patients will continue to be treated as per the initiation criteria as long as there has been observable improvements in their diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes patients purchasing FreeStyle Libre independently or through a private arrangement


If the patient meets NHS England guidance for initiation of FGS, the patient can be referred into the NHS Type 1 diabetes service. Do not make an urgent referral. Patients should continue to self-fund until the NHS diabetes specialist service has considered initiation in line with NHS England guidance.

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