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Novorapid & Levemir

Not a lot to report today, so thought I would tell you a bit about the insulins that I take. For those of you who are type I diabetics, this will be dull and you will probably know all about it, but for others, it may be good to see what is involved. Apologies if the picture below makes you feel uneasy, but it shows what an insulin pen looks like.

The needle attached is the smallest they do and is 5mm. The dial on the right is used to select the amount of insulin you want to inject. You then press the button and it clicks until the right dose is selected.

This insulin is called Novorapid. As the name suggests, this is a rapid action that starts working in 10 to 15 minutes. It peaks (as far as I can tell, although opinions on the net vary) in just over an hour and can be in the blood stream for 3-5 hours. I have also read that it can be gone in 2 hours, so am not sure about this figures. Novorapid is taken before meals and means that you can vary the times of your meal and if you want a meal high or low in carbohydrates you can change your dose accordingly. The technical name for this type of insulin is a bolus insulin.

The other insulin that I take is called Levemir. This is taken using a pen that looks the same as the Novorapid, except that it is green. It is an insulin analogue. This means that it is an insulin molecule with another molecule (glargine) attached. Although I can't find the exact mechanism at the moment, it appears the glargine molecule changes the solubility of the insulin. If the insulin doesn't dissolve in the blood stream, it can't be absorbed. The glargine molecule is gradually changed by the blood stream and dissolves leaving the insulin also to dissolve. This takes a number of hours and is gradual. In this way the insulin gets released over time. This is about 24 hours depending on the dose. Levemir is a basal insulin, i.e. it controls your baseline insulin. Lecture over!

Other events of note, was my successful cycle to and from work yesterday. It was hard work and my legs ached at the end, but it seemed to have a positive influence on my blood glucose and also made me feel good in myself! Didn't cycle today as it was throwing it down with rain and I am showing some people around the factory at 19:00 today so wanted to have time to have supper at home and come back.

The training course at work is still ongoing, therefore the buffet leftovers keep appearing. Today, they can't have been hungry as the picture of the left-overs shows:

As my levels were a bit high at lunchtime, I didn't eat any of it. The site secretary however sent me an email to say that she had saved me a couple of cans of Diet Coke as compensation. I was touched!

Finally, Abby wanted to come to work with me today. As it was raining she insisted on putting her wellies on with her dressing gown! Picture below:
Threw a bit of a tantrum when I said she couldn't come. What a confusing world it must be for a toddler, but I love her to bits!



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