Skip to main content

Stop the Press!

In my time as Production Manager of a newspaper printing site, now stretching back more than fifteen years, I have indeed called, or more precisely phoned people to exclaim "STOP THE PRESS"!  However, I am now faced with a metaphorical stop the press situation.  Our site in Birmingham has been placed into consultation for closure alongside our Luton press site.  Around 150 jobs are at risk, including my own.  The question is regularly voiced: "Are you alright?"  It's not a question I know how to answer two days after I was given the news.  I tend to say that I am, but I don't really know to what extent I am alright.  Is there are measure of alrightness?!  

For me, this enforced situation isn't a total surprise although it was only one of a few scenarios which I believed may happen.  Additionally, I had been considering the future and making plans for a long time, but not actually doing something about it!  As I'm in my mid-40's I knew that newspaper printing would probably not sustain me for the rest of my working life.  I have been making background preparations for that move for at least the past year.  However, when it happens and you are given your letter, it doesn't stop it being raw.  I am not primarily concerned with the basic needs of security and finance because I have been fortunate in this area.  However what is hitting hardest is the loss of my 'printing family' whether it is the colleagues from the office who I interact with on a daily basis, the superb team that we have across the Birmingham site who now face a period of uncertainty and upheaval, or those hundreds of occasional contacts across many business areas.

This is a great opportunity for me.  However, with opportunity comes risk and big decisions, especially in the midst of a pandemic.  I was speaking with some colleagues; for most of your working and personal life, you don't have to make many life-changing decisions and at the time you may not know how crucial those decisions are. To make a change of career-path from one you've followed for your working life to something different is one such life-changing decision.  To say that is daunting is perhaps an understatement.  Perhaps this is the measure of alrightness I'm looking for - yes, I am alright, but daunted by the decisions ahead.  I am extraordinarily fortunate - I have qualifications and I have contacts.  I have a supermarketful of opportunities.  I have a shopping list, but am not sure which aisle to go down.  I know that I will work it out and I will plan a new path; how I get there will be the focus of the next few months.  The time to make those plans is now, so I better get on with it!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The CCG Project!

In order to find out the situation around the country for Libre prescribing now that the national policy has been published, I have made the decision to contact many of them to find out their plans.  I have arbitrarily chosen to contact all English CCGs that in December 2018 prescribed Libre via Primary Care to less than 5% of their population (and one specific request from a group member).  I had hoped this would be a small list, but there are 135 CCGs on the list.  I may have bitten off more than I can chew, but I'm committed to doing this and feeding back.  It worked before and hopefully this level of scrutiny will bring similar results. Below is a screenshot of the base document I am sending to each of the CCGs - it has some fields that are merge fields, so don't worry about the brackets and codes in the document (I found a typo, which has now been corrected too) .  The major piece of work with respect to this is finding the right person to contact.  However, I have s

Shut the stable door before....oops

One of my get well cards! On Tuesday 23rd April I was leading my wife's horse from the field. My daughter was behind with her horse (we're honestly not that posh.. We do all the work ourselves and do it cost effectively.). A third horse decided it didn't want to be left in the field, so pushed past and frightened the horse I was leading. It bolted and ran straight into me, fracturing my tibial plateau. (the part of the tibia bone just below the knee). The next day, I was operated on under GA to permanently pin/plate the knee area back together. See x-rays below for what they did. Continued below, but in case you don't want to keep reading, here is the current situation as of 1st June I'm still at least four weeks off being able to bend my leg, but am basically OK.  Claire has all-but had her diagnosis of early-onset rheumatoid arthritis.  Not great, but hopefully treatment will start soon. And...as of 5th June, I'm now able to bend the leg and put f

Speaking of Diabetes

Happy New Year!  Hope you had a great festive period. Language There have been so many discussions about language over the past years and rightly so.   I don’t tend to contribute to these discussions as I can see both sides of the argument and I don’t think the 280 character limit of Twitter enables a rational discussion on this topic to be undertaken.   I hope that this blog post may help to provoke some sensible discussion.   There are a few areas I think worth exploring. Audience I think this is key to any discussions about language and diabetes.   What is acceptable to say in one forum could very well be unacceptable in another.   What is acceptable for someone with scant knowledge of or contact with diabetes, may certainly not be acceptable to someone that is in regular contact with diabetes (or dare I say it with diabetics!).   The key is not to stifle discussion.   I think that the current situation where any perceived deviation from the textbook way of talking about